Home Wiki Case Studies Contributors Forum Contact Us Log In search



Global Ozone Project



Back to case study
5

The GO3 Foundation seeks to determine ozone levels worldwide by engaging students in the research process soup to nuts, starting with putting together industrial-strength measurement instruments themselves.


Hi, I'm Dr. John Birks, founder of the GO3 Project. We are very excited for the GO3 Project to be featured on NSF's Media & Informal Science Learning website, and I am very interested in receiving feedback and suggestions about our project. We are also hoping to explore new potential collaborations/partnerships as we continue to expand GO3 around the country and the world. Thanks for checking out our project! -John

Vote for Comment
Comment Score:
0


Jul 09, 2010 10:05 am
add comment



Hello Dr. Birks. I think it's great that you are involving kids in this very important research effort, and I'm impressed at how international it seems to be getting already so quickly. I had a suggestion for you, because it looks like you haven't been able to find sponsors yet for everyone who wants to participate. You might want to put together a package of materials (PowerPoints, hand-outs, etc.) on the site that schools can download and use to raise money themselves in their local communities. The materials could include ideas for fundraisers, what kinds of groups or people to get involved in the effort, etc. I'm pretty sure there are a bunch of places/organizations online that already help teachers and schools with this--you could use some of their materials for guidance to create pitches specifically for your project, or maybe partner with them, too.

Vote for Comment
Comment Score:
0


Jul 12, 2010 11:08 am
add comment



Hello Octavia. I work with Dr. Birks on the GO3 Project. Thank you so much for your suggestion! You have a wonderful idea - we are definitely going to take your suggestion and I will start researching how to go about it. The project has been received very enthusiastically by teachers and students from all over the US and internationally. It seems to be something that fits quite well into the lesson plans teachers are developing for environmental science classes, as well as requirements for the International Baccalaureate. Thanks again for your suggestion and don't hesitate to contact me if you have any questions. -Jessa Ellenburg

Vote for Comment
Comment Score:
0


Jul 12, 2010 01:33 pm
add comment
--Jessa



I just finished editing a story for Campus Technology magazine about students at Auburn University who have used handheld and GIS technologies to map 12,000 critical infrastructure points (electric power poles, telephone switches, gas meters and valves etc) along 90 miles of Gulf coastline, to help emergency workers find these elements in the event of a disaster. The project just shows you the power of students as researchers -- we've seen this as far back as National Geographic Kids Network, when elementary age kids were collecting water samples that gave scientists valuable information on acid rain. I think one way to promote your project is to get local press coverage of the work students are doing. It will help spread the word among communities, and perhaps lead to being picked up by national press.I also think that there could be database of environmental projects that are run by student researchers.

Vote for Comment
Comment Score:
0


Jul 13, 2010 11:35 am
add comment



Hi Therese. The GIS project sounds very interesting! I couldn't agree more - many scientists have expressed interest in using the data, from state officials to scientists with the EPA. Students are a very powerful group, and the project seeks to tap into their power. We have had some local press and are pursuing national press, especially when the school year starts in the fall. Let me know if you have any additional thoughts on this in the coming months! -Jessa

Vote for Comment
Comment Score:
0


Jul 13, 2010 12:42 pm
add comment
--Jessa



Hi John and Jessa. This looks like a great project and the website is very accessible. In Boulder, CO there are a number of organizations that have similar programs that place equipment in the hands of students and teachers to collect scientifically valid data. The most comprehensive and longest running is The Globe Project housed at UCAR. A new institute, NEON, will shortly have environment monitoring stations in approximately 60 locations. You might be able to arrange for your equipment to be paired with theirs or arrange to have nearby schools receive your equipment. There are a number of other "citizen scientist" models I know of and I am willing to discuss them in greater detail. If you want more details and contact information, I am located in Boulder, too. Do not hesitate to contact me (doug@hallerconsulting.com/www.hallerconsulting.com) D

Vote for Comment
Comment Score:
0


Jul 14, 2010 03:51 pm
add comment
--Doug



Hi, I am Leonardo Enríquez, teacher of Vocational Education in Chemistry in Madrid, Spain. We are very proud to be the first school outside USA connected to GO3 network. For us this experience is excellent to introduce concepts as data acquisition, maintenance, surveillance and calibration of equipment. We also carry out a continous comparison of our results with the official ozone data from Madrid environmental authorities. We also used the excellent Powerpoint about Ozone that is available in the Curriculum page of GO3 website, and we are translating it to spanish language. I would like to thank to the 2B Technologies staff, specially Jessa Ellenburg, for the help supplied to overcome connection problems. We hope to supply ozone data for a long time, as we think we are located in a city and area really threatened by high ozone levels. Best Regards Leonardo

Vote for Comment
Comment Score:
0


Jul 15, 2010 12:10 am
add comment



Congratulations and thank you for initiating this important project. I had no idea that ozone was still an issue until I read about your project here. If I might make one suggestion, I think you should succinctly describe the ozone issue in a few sentences right at the top of your home page since that is what you're all about. Otherwise newcomers to the site only see that you have a school project without knowing what the issue is. (The description of the ozone issue on this Institute for Learning Innovation website works very well.) Thanks again for spreading good science and environmental action around the globe.

Vote for Comment
Comment Score:
0


Jul 24, 2010 06:23 am
add comment



Hi Ben. Thanks for your suggestion - I agree with your idea about describing the "issue" on the homepage. I have found that many people, including me until I started working on this project, are not aware of the ground level ozone problem facing the world. I will work on incorporating your suggestion into our home page. Thanks again. Jessa

Vote for Comment
Comment Score:
0


Jul 27, 2010 12:37 pm
add comment
--Jessa



Central High School proudly became the first school outside of Colorado to participate in this project. Having the monitor right in the classroom drives home the importance of ground level ozone to the health of us and our environment. Students do weekly reports on environmental issues and frequently see news of "air quality action days" -- knowing about ground level ozone helps students to understand how serious these action days can be not only to those with respiratory issues but also to healthy people. We look forward to expanding the ozone component of our curriculum with the information provided by the GO3 Project.

Vote for Comment
Comment Score:
0


Aug 06, 2010 09:05 am
add comment



It has been our pleasure at Erie High School to take part in the GO3 project. The project has clearly developed a heightened awareness of the Ozone in our school as well as in our community. It has been outstanding for our participating students as they have had the opportunity to experience the data acquisition and analysis of this data. They are also excited that the information that they are acquiing may eventually be utilized by scientists from the EPA. Our local press has also enjoyed being a part of this project. A special thanks to Jessa Ellenburg, who continually visits our students with information and encouragement. We welcome communication from other high schools who are also involved with the GO3 Project.

Vote for Comment
Comment Score:
0


Aug 10, 2010 07:27 am
add comment
--Steve



If you are interested in a science partner I will suggest Chuck Kolb from Aerodyne. His "Fed-Ex" syle moving lab did some excellent work on secondary pollution for the MILAGRO project in Mexico City. His connections of vehicle emissions from the center of the city to ozone production in the surrounding hills is very powerful. ------------------------------------------------------------------------- Tobias McElheny Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Science Media Group Science Education Dept. 60 Garden Street - MS-82 Cambridge, MA 02138 E-mail:tmcelheny@cfa.harvard.edu Tel:(617)-496-7758 Fax:(617)-496-7670 -------------------------------------------------------------------------

Vote for Comment
Comment Score:
0


Aug 19, 2010 12:46 pm
add comment



Hi Tobias. Thank you so much for your suggestion - I will definitely get in touch with Chuck. I have heard of the MILAGRO project from one of the teachers I work with and I would love to get a student monitoring site in Mexico City. Perhaps he can provide us with some interesting information from his studies that I can integrate into the curriculum we provide. Thanks again, Jessa

Vote for Comment
Comment Score:
0


Aug 23, 2010 02:26 pm
add comment
--Jessa



The Anglo American School of Moscow is excited to be able to participate in this project. As of August 27, 2010 we have only got the ozone monitoring equipment set up and downloading data. During the previous weeks there were extensive forest fires in the Moscow area which created such high smog levels that the filter became clogged with particulate matter, so some of the data collected over the summer was not valid. We are looking forward to using the data with our grade 9 Environmental Science students, grade 11 Ecosystems and Society students and Physics 12 students. It be great to have them analyze actual local data and compare it with data from other schools around the world.

Vote for Comment
Comment Score:
0


Aug 26, 2010 08:33 pm
add comment





Add a comment
You must be logged in to post a comment. Login Now

 
 
 



.





Web Analytics